Democratic Socialists of America convention explodes with complaints of 'sensory overload' and gendered pronouns

A Democratic Socialists of America convention erupted on Sunday as delegates repeatedly interrupted speakers and each other to launch formal complaints about "sensory overload" and the use of gendered pronouns. "Uh, quick point of personal privilege, um guys," an audience member called out as the chairwoman was giving remarks. "I just want to say, can we please keep the chatter to the minimum? I'm one of the people who's very, very prone to sensory overload. "There's a lot of whispering and chattering going on. It's making it very difficult for me to focus," he continued. "Please, I know we're all fresh and ready to go, but can we please just keep the chatter to a minimum? It's affecting my ability to focus." However, before the chairwoman could return to her comments, another person in the crowd called out, "Point of personal privilege! Point of personal privilege!" After being given permission to speak, the attendee requested, "Please do not use gendered language to address everyone!"

Later on, the first attendee asked to express a "quick point of privilege yet again." "I have already asked people to be mindful of the chatter of their comrades who are sensitive to sensory overload," he said. "And that goes double for the heckling and the hissing. It is also triggering to my anxiety. Like, being comradely isn't just for like, keeping things civil or whatever. It's so people aren't going to get triggered, and so that it doesn't affect their performance as a delegate."

The incidents, footage of which spread online, were widely mocked by commentators and social media users. Democratic socialism has been gaining steam in the United States, and the ideology is embraced by a handful of members of Congress, including Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/democratic-socialists-of-america-convention-explodes-with-complaints-of-sensory-overload-and-gendered-pronouns