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Leon Black (Black family Foundation / Apollo Global Management) Call to dig

Post 7194511 View on 8kun

>>7194490

>>7194438 Leon Black (Black family Foundation / Apollo Global Management) Call to dig

Bread shitter (me)

Sorry Baker

Been digging posted near end of last didn't realize the bread was flying.

Post 7194932 View on 8kun

>>7194511

Lots here to connect to Apollo. Tiger Global management and the Tiger Cub Program. This started 38 different hedge funds.

This is the latest form 4 on Apollo's Site

TIGER GLOBAL MANAGEMENT LLC

9 WEST 57TH STREET

35TH FLOOR

NEW YORK, NY 10019

X

Coleman Charles P III

C/O TIGER GLOBAL MANAGEMENT, LLC

9 WEST 57TH STREET, 35TH FLOOR

NEW YORK, NY 10019

X

SHLEIFER SCOTT L

C/O TIGER GLOBAL MANAGEMENT, LLC

9 WEST 57TH STREET, 35TH FLOOR

NEW YORK, NY 10019

X

Fixel Lee

C/O TIGER GLOBAL MANAGEMENT, LLC

9 WEST 57TH STREET, 35TH FLOOR

NEW YORK, NY 10019

https://otp.tools.investis.com/clients/us/apollo/SEC/sec-show.aspx?Type=html&FilingId=13520366&CIK=0001411494&Index=10000

Tiger Management

Tiger Management Corp., also known as "The Tiger Fund," is an American hedge fund and family office founded by Julian Robertson. The fund began investing in 1980 and was closed to outside investors in March 2000. It continues to operate today in direct public equity investments and seeding new investment funds.

Julian Robertson, a stockbroker and former United States Navy officer, started Tiger Management in 1980 with $8 million in capital. By 1996, the fund’s assets had increased to $7.2 billion in value.

On April 1, 1996 BusinessWeek carried a cover story written by reporter Gary Weiss, called "Fall of the Wizard", that was critical of Robertson's performance and behavior as founder and manager of Tiger Management. Robertson subsequently sued Weiss and BusinessWeek for $1 billion for defamation. The suit was settled with no money changing hands and BusinessWeek standing by the substance of its reporting.

After closing his Tiger Fund in 2000, Robertson started to use his own capital, experience, and infrastructure to support and finance ("seed") upcoming hedge fund managers.

As of September 2009, Robertson has helped launch 38 hedge funds ("Tiger Seeds") in return for a stake in their fund management companies.

Apart from those Tiger Seeds, a considerable number of analysts and managers Robertson employed and mentored at Tiger Management went out on their own and are now running some of the best-known hedge fund firms, called "Tiger Cubs",run by Tiger alumni such as Ole Andreas Halvorsen, Chris Shumway, Lee Ainslie, Stephen Mandel, John Griffin, David Gerstenhaber, David Goel, and Paul Touradji.

"The modern-day emergence of hedge funds can be attributed to a 1986 article in the Institutional Investor highlighting the extraordinary returns of the Tiger Fund. The article spurred investor interest and financing; since that time, hedge funds have increasingly attracted investment and human capital."

The Wall Street Journal reported in June 2010 that Robertson was considering reopening his firm to outside investors. John Townsend, a former partner at Goldman Sachs, was hired as the chief operating officer, and Robertson's son Alex joined the firm. The new hires were part of a potential expansion that could involve creating a "seeding" fund or a fund of hedge funds for outside investors. According to Institutional Investor magazine, that year many of the Tiger-seeded funds were struggling.

With $10.5 billion of assets under management in 1997, it was the second largest hedge fund in the world at the time. Its holdings climbed to $22 billion in 1998.

Tiger's largest equity holding at that time was U.S. Airways, whose troubles dragged down the value of his holdings. Such missteps ultimately led him to close his investment company in March 2000 and return all outside capital to investors. Tiger earlier made $2 billion in gains, but then it gave most of them back during a huge one-day move in the yen in 1998. In September 2001, Robertson distributed 24.8 million greatly devalued U.S. Airways shares over to former investors in Tiger. Robertson declared his intent to keep the stock. U.S. Airways declared bankruptcy in 2002, and shareholders in the airline were wiped out.

In December 2018, it was announced that Tiger global together Accel finance Series A of funding of software producing startup Facilio.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiger_Management

Andreas Halvorsen

Founding Partner & Chief Executive Officer, Viking Global Investors

Andreas Halvorsen runs hedge fund Viking Global Investors.

A former Tiger Cub who once traded equities at Julian Robertson's Tiger Management, he struck out on his own with Viking in 1999.

The Connecticut-based firm now manages more than $25 billion in assets.

After flagship Viking Global hedge fund lost 4% net of fees in 2016, Halvorsen parted with CIO Daniel Sundheim and returned $8 billion to investors.

In 2017 Viking's main hedge fund returned about 12% net of fees, driven by its long positions.

https://www.forbes.com/profile/andreas-halvorsen/#74c88c3a3473