interview with the Heather Higgins with the Epoch Times. relevant quote at 25:40

https://youtu.be/zpwIE0C1Lyg?t=1540

"Jonathan Haidt wrote a marvelous book called "The Righteous Mind." One of the things that he observed—he wrote it as a liberal Democrat trying to persuade, teach Democrats how to talk more effectively to conservatives he kept seeing them missing the boat. Part of that was because they've got a different set of values that matter to them, that matter to conservatives, so they tend to dismiss the conservative values.

But he also observed along the way, in this book, that when you asked conservatives what liberals were thinking, they were very accurate. But if you ask liberals what conservatives were thinking, they were very bad. He also observed that conservatives tend to be good at figuring out—I think maybe because conservatives think in terms of systems, where if you put something into place, you could have secondary and tertiary consequences—that would be adverse to the goals that you were trying to reach. So they understood incentives and consequences. Whereas if you talk to liberals, they tend to be unbelievably bad at seeing the secondary and tertiary consequences of the programs they were developing, which is why they're susceptible to utopian ideas. They're so caught up in the goodness of their intentions, that they don't see the bad consequences that are likely to ensue. I don't know if Joe Biden anticipated that saying, "For the first 100 days, we're gonna let immigrants into the country. And now you've had a caravan. I don't know if he connected those two, but it was so obvious that was going to happen. Anybody thought of it?

By the way, libertarians are second to liberals in not seeing the consequences of their ideas (kek). Because again, you're starting with a mental framework, and it's more important that you achieve that mental framework, such as the utopian idea of free society, and you don't see where these things can have problems in implementation.

So fascinating.

It's a lot of psychological work, apparently, behind that. Clearly a book that needs to be read. It is. "The Righteous Mind" is an excellent book."

rational vs emotional.